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Correspondence Agenda - 2020/10/15 The Corporation of the Township of Malahide CORRESPONDENCE AGENDA October 15, 2020 7:30 p.m. (F) Correspondence: 1. Association of Municipalities of Ontario - Watch File dated October 1 and 8, 2020. (Pages C3 - 7) 2. Town of Wasaga Beach Correspondence to the Premier regarding unauthorized car rallies and suggested deterrents for future rallies. (Pages 8 - 10) 3. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing Safe Restart Agreement (Pages C11 - 13) 4. Township of North Glengarry Resolution requesting the Province to allow capital expenditures under the Safe Restart Program. (Page C14) 5. Lake of Bays Correspondence to Province requesting reform to Municipal Insurance Policy. (Pages C145 - 16) 6. Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) Annual Report on the Federal Gas Tax Fund. (Pages C17) 7. Minister of Solicitor General -Racism Initiatives. (Pages C18 - 24) 8. County of Wellington Correspondence and draft Resolution requesting Province to work with MPAC to review assessments for aggregate resource properties. (Page C25 - 30) 9. Township of Asphodel-Norwood Resolution regarding Cannabis requesting the Province to take a unified approach to land use planning restrictions, enforce regulations and communicate with local municipalities. (Pages 31 32) 10. Municipality of Central Elgin Notice of Proposed Zoning By-law Amendment relating to the following properties: - 220 Prospect Street, Port Stanley. (Page C33) - 42025 McBain Line. (Page C34) 11. Town of Aylmer Public Hearing relating to a Minor Variance Application for the property located at 206 Sydenham Street East. (Page C35) 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Ministry ofMinistère des Municipal AffairsAffaires municipales and Housinget du Logement Office of the MinisterBureau du ministre the 777 Bay Street, 17Floor777, rue Bay,17étage Toronto ON M7A 2J3Toronto ON M7A 2J3 Tel.:416585-7000Tél.:416585-7000 234-2020-4339 October 1, 2020 Dear Head of Council: Under the federal-provincial Safe Restart Agreement, the Ontario government is providing up to $4 billion in emergency assistance so thatmunicipalities are supportedas they respond to COVID-19.Funding for municipalities under the Safe Restart Agreement is being provided through four streams: the Social Services Relief Fund and Municipal OperatingFunding that are being implemented by my ministry, as well as funding streams for public health and transitbeing administered by the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Transportation respectively. On August12, 2020, Iwrote to advise of your municipalitPhase 1 of the Municipal Operating Funding stream.The ministry is currently in the process of making those payments.Today,Iam writingto provide information on applying for additional funding under Phase 2 of the Municipal Operating Funding stream. Our government recognizes that municipalities play a key role in deliveringthe services that Ontariansrely on and areatthe frontlines of safely reopening our economy.Through Phase 2, we are committed to providing furtherfinancial support tothosemunicipalities that require additional fundsto address extraordinaryoperatingexpenditures and revenue losses arising from COVID-19in 2020,over andabove the allocation provided under Phase 1. Our government choseto distribute a very significant level of funding to municipalities under Phase 1 $695 million in total because we wanted to ensure all municipalities across our provincecould continue to deliver the important services theirresidents and businesses rely on while supportingthe safe reopening of our economy. For amajority of municipalities, I anticipate thisPhase 1funding,together with the actions you have taken to find efficiencies and address shortfalls, will be sufficient tomanage 2020 financial pressures arising from COVID-19.However, for the group of municipalities that has been hardest hit financially by COVID-19, additional funding may be needed. Requests for Phase 2 funding are due on October 30, 2020 and detailed information about how to apply is now available to municipalities through the Transfer Payment Ontario (TPON) system. 12 One of the requirements is a council resolution requesting financial assistanceunder Phase 2.I want to emphasize that councils are responsible for assessing the financial situation of their municipalities and proceeding with an application under Phase 2 only if further assistance is needed to address COVID-19 pressures in 2020. Municipalities that cannot demonstrate 2020 COVID-19 financial pressuresin excess of their Phase 1 funding allocation will not beconsidered foradditional funding under Phase 2. In addition toaresolution of your municipal council, a reporting template must be completed by the municipal treasurer as part of sPhase 2 application package. This report is designed to provide anoverall picture of the financial positionand informationabout service adjustments, use of reserves, and other measures being takento manage 2020 COVID-19operating impacts. Our government will allocate Phase 2 funds to only those municipalities that need additional financial assistance. Thereport also asksfor information about finding efficiencies and modernizing services. I look forward to learning about the transformative work that I know is happening across and your efforts to keep taxes low for families in your communities. We are not requiring municipalities to submit information about COVID-related costs and revenue losses on a line-by-line basis, and as such the program will not offer a direct line-by-line reimbursement for all COVID-related operating expenditures and revenue losses reported. The federal government has stepped up. Our government is providing an unprecedented level of provincial funding to support municipalities.And we recognize that municipalities also have a critical role to play in finding efficiencies and taking all available measures to address the financial challenges brought by COVID-19 so that they can continue to invest in infrastructure and deliver the services their communities rely on during this extraordinary time. As noted above, detailed information about how to apply for Phase 2 funding is now available on Transfer Payment Ontario. The ministry will also offer webinars to support treasurers and other municipal officials in understanding Phase 2 application requirements and how to complete the required reporting template. Please note that the deadline to submit applications is October 30, 2020.Municipalities may request an extension November 6, 2020, but as noted in my letter of August 12, 2020,we will be unable to consider applications received after this date. I understand this timeline is tight, but it is necessary to allow us to allocate funds to municipalities prior to the end of the municipal fiscal year and meet our commitment to municipalities that need additional help to manage 2020 financial impacts arising from COVID-19. Municipalities who are eligible and approved to receive funding under Phase 2will be informed beforethe end of the calendar yearand can expect to receive a payment inearly 2021. 13 I will continue to be a strong champion for municipalities as our government chartsa path to a safe, strong economic recovery. I extend my thanks to all 444 municipal heads of council for your continued efforts to keep all of our communities across this province safeand to deliver the services your residents and businesses need. Working together, we will get Ontario back on track. Sincerely, Steve Clark Ministerof Municipal Affairs and Housing c. Chief Administrative Officers and Treasurers 14 15 16 17 CƩƚƒʹ Federal Gas Tax Program <GasTax@amo.on.ca> {ĻƓƷʹ October 1, 2020 9:13 AM ƚʹ Dave Mennill <DMennill@malahide.ca> /ĭʹ Michelle Casavecchia-Somers <MCasavecchia@malahide.ca>; Arundhati Mohile <AMohile@malahide.ca> {ǒĬƆĻĭƷʹ AMO's annual report on the federal Gas Tax Fund is now available Dear Mayor Mennill, I'm pleased to announce the release of AMO's latest annual reporton the federal Gas Tax Fund. The report describes how our sector is investing federal Gas Tax funds to better serve residents and local businesses. I encourage you to review the report and share it with your colleagues on Council. Sincerely, Graydon Smith AMO President cc: Michelle Casavecchia-Somers, CAO/Clerk cc: Arundhati Mohile, Director of Finance/Treasurer 18 Solicitor GeneralSolliciteur général Office of the Solicitor GeneralBureau de la solliciteure générale the 25 Grosvenor Street, 18 Floor 25, rue Grosvenor, 18 étage Toronto ON M7A 1Y6 Toronto ON M7A 1Y6 Tel: 416 325-0408 Tél.: 416 325-0408 MCSCS.Feedback@Ontario.caMCSCS.Feedback@Ontario.ca 132-2020-3484 By email October 2, 2020 Dear Head of Council: The Ministry of the Solicitor General is committed to keeping communities across Ontario safe, supported and protected. I would like to take this opportunity to share some information with your municipality regarding the anti-racism initiatives of my ministry and the Anti-Racism Directorate (ARD), the regulatory work being done to bring the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, into force, new police oversight measures, police training as it relates to de-escalation, mental health and diverse communities, mental health and addictions initiatives and investments, Community Safety and Well-Being (CSWB) Planning and police-hospital transition protocol. Anti-Racism Our government haszero tolerance for hate, racism or discrimination in all its forms. We share a responsibility to speak out and act against racism and hate and build a stronger society. Our government is committed to addressing racism and building a stronger, more inclusive province for us all. I am proud to be the minister responsible for Ontario’s Anti-Racism Directorate (ARD), which leads strategic initiatives to advance anti-racism work across government with a plan that is grounded in evidence and research. Through the ARD, the government continues to invest in community-led research, public education and awareness initiatives. This includes investments to the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Ontario to undertake research that seeks to identify key mental health issues impacting survivors of victims of homicide violence in Ontario. Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019 Our government is also committed to addressing racism at a systemic level through the regulatory framework under the Anti-Racism Act, 2017, and through the work we are doing to bring the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, into force. As we work to develop regulations under the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, we will continue to engage racialized groups, including Black, South Asian, First Nation, Inuit and Métis organizations.We are committed to ensuring that Ontario’s communities are well supported and protected by law enforcement and that all interactions between members of the public and police personnel are conducted without bias or discrimination, and in a manner that promotes public confidence and keeps our communities safe. …/2 19 Head of Council Page 2 The Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019,which is part of the Comprehensive Ontario Police Services Act, 2019, provides policing and police oversight legislation. Once in force, the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, will address a number of recommendations made by Justice Michael H. Tulloch, including: Mandatory training for all police service board members, the Inspector General, inspectors,police officers andspecial constables on human rights, systemic racism as well as training that promotes the diverse, multiracial and multicultural character of Ontario society and the rights and cultures of First Nation, Inuit and Métis Peoples; The requirement for each municipalitythat maintains a municipal boardto prepare and publish a diversity plan to ensure members of the board are representative ofthe diversity of the population of the municipality; Not releasing the names of officials and witnesses in SIU investigations; Ensuring information made available to the public about an SIU investigation helps them understand the decision made by the SIU director; and Ensuring the SIU continues to publish investigative reports on its website. New Measures for Police Oversight Inspector General of Policing The Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, will establish an Inspector General (IG) of Policing who will be required to monitor and conduct inspections related to compliance with the Act and regulations. The IG will work with policing entities to ensure consistent application of policing across the province by measuring compliance with prescribed standards. Key functions of the IG include: Consulting with, advising, monitoring and conducting inspections of police service boards, Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) detachment boards, First Nation OPP boards, OPP Advisory Council, chiefs of police, special constable employers, police services and other policing providers regarding compliance with the Act and regulations. Receiving and investigating, if warranted, public complaints about members of police service boards, OPP detachment boards, First Nation OPP boards and the OPP Advisory Council regarding misconduct and policing complaints regarding the provision of adequate and effective policing, failure to comply with the Act and regulations, and policies and procedures. Reporting inspection findings, issuing directions to remedy or prevent non- compliance with the Act and imposing measures if the direction is not complied with, or, reprimanding, suspending or removing a board member if board member misconduct is identified. Conducting analysis regarding compliance with the Act and regulations. Reporting on the activities of the IG annually, including inspections conducted, complaints dealt with, directions issued and measures imposed; and compliance with the Act and regulations. …/3 20 Head of Council Page 3 The Act also gives the IG and its inspectors the right to access closed police service board meetings. Law Enforcement Complaints Agency The Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019 will continue the office of the Independent Police Review Director as the Law Enforcement Complaints Agency (LECA), headed by the Complaints Director. The LECA will receive and screen complaints from the public about the conduct of police officers. In addition, the LECA will have the authority to initiate an investigation in the absence of a public complaint if, in the Complaints Director’s opinion, it is in the public interest to do so. The Complaints Director may also undertake reviews of issues of a systemic nature that have been the subject of public complaints or investigations, or that may contribute or otherwise be related to misconduct. The Special Investigations Unit The Special Investigations Unit Act, 2019, (SIU Act), once in force, will set out a new legal framework for the SIU. The SIU Act will focus and clarify the mandate of the SIU to better ensure more timely, efficient, reasonable and transparent investigations. Key changes contained in the Act will focus the SIU’s investigative resources where they are needed most – on criminal activity. The Ministry of the Attorney General will continue to consult with law enforcement, community organizations and advocates to ensure their input is incorporated into the development of regulations under the SIU Act. Police Training Training is developed and delivered in a manner that reinforces principles of fairness, equity and compliance with the Ontario Human Rights Code and Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. All Basic Constable Training (BCT) recruits undergo diversity-focused training designed to improve their ability to engage with the public and respond to victims of crime. This training focuses on improving recruits’ understanding of the experiences of, and systemic barriers faced by, diverse communities, including racialized, Indigenous, First Nations and Metis, and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning and Two-Spirited (LGBTQ2S) people. Diversity and anti-racism training includes: Human rights framework for policing; Equity and inclusion; Harassment and discrimination; …/4 21 Head of Council Page 4 Defining police professional; Collection of Identifying Information in Certain Circumstances regulation; History of profiling in policing and the impact of racial profiling on the community; Profiling practices and the mindset behind it; Stereotyping; Bias free policing – racial profiling vs. criminal profiling; Hate crimes and bias incidents of a non-criminal nature; and Practical skills scenario that reinforces academic learning on hate crimes. Training on Indigenous issues includes: Indigenous culture; Residential schools; Land claims and treaties; First Nations Policing; Cultural appropriation; Cultural practices; and Practical skills scenario that reinforces academic learning on Indigenous issues. The Serving with Pride organization attends each intake to deliver a presentation to all recruits entitled “LGBTQ2S 101” which covers a number of issues related to the LGBTQ2S communities including historical events, current and appropriate terminology, gender expression, gender identity and other topics. In addition to the standalone sessions, the above noted issues are interwoven and reinforced throughout the BCT program. For example, recruits are taught to respond to victims in a trauma-informed manner for all victims of crime acknowledging potentially vulnerable groups. De-escalation and Mental Health Crisis Response Training The Ontario Police College’s current de-escalation training emphasizes communication techniques such as establishing rapport, threat management and conflict resolution and mediation. The training specifically addresses scenarios in which police interact with people in crisis with a goal of resolving conflicts in a manner that protects the safety of the public, the person in crisis and police officers. Officers must also undertake follow-up training every 12 months. Police services are also encouraged to have policies and procedures in place as set out in the “Use of Force” Guideline. This includes procedures for impact weapons, aerosol weapons, conducted energy weapons, firearms and use of force reporting. Training on the BCT program is reviewed and updated to reflect the most current information after every BCT intake. …/5 22 Head of Council Page 5 Once in force, the Community Safety and Policing Act, 2019, will require all police officers, special constables and board members to successfully complete training related to human rights, systemic racism and the rights and cultures of Indigenous Peoples. This training will also be required for the new Inspector General of Policing, its inspectors, the Complaints Director at LECA and LECA investigators. This is part of the government’s commitment to ensure that all interactions are conducted without bias or discrimination, and in a manner that promotes public confidence and keeps communities safe. Mental Health and Addictions Initiatives and Investments Dedicated Funding for Mental Health and Addictions Programs Ontario’s community mental health services include: assertive community treatment teams, case management, crisis intervention, early psychosis intervention, eating disorders programs, vocational programs, supportive housing and consumer/survivor initiatives, peer supports and other programs; and initiatives to keep people with serious mental health issues out of the criminal justice system which include, but are not limited to, court support and diversion, crisis intervention and safe beds. In July 2018, Ontario announced its commitment to invest $3.8 billion over 10 years, with the support of the Government of Canada, to develop and implement a comprehensive and connected mental health and addictions strategy. This includes $174 million for mental health and addictions programs in 2019-20. As part of the $174 million commitment of funds to support mental health and addictions in 2019-20, my ministry partnered with the Ministry of Health to announce $18.3 million in new funding to support those affected by mental health and addictions challenges in the justice sector. Specifically, in 2019-20, the Ministry of Health provided funding for an integrated set of mobile crisis services that assist in the de-escalation and stabilization of persons in crisis and their connection to community programming and supports to address their physical and mental well-being over the longer term, in order to prevent further crises. Five teams were implemented in 2019-20 with $6.95 million of the $174 million in new, annualized funding to develop and enhance mobile crisis services. Mobile crisis services partner police with community mental health organizations to respond to persons in mental health and addictions (MHA) crises and determine if the crisis: can be de-escalated and resolved at the scene; warrants further psychiatric attention at hospital emergency rooms; or requires short-term community stabilization and reintegration. Part of the $18.3 million in new funding also includes $2.5 million for various programs run by the ministry, one of which includesde-escalation training. …/6 23 Head of Council Page 6 Ministry of the Solicitor General Grant Programs Apart from thededicated funding for mental health and addictions programs highlighted above, the ministry also offers a number of grant programs that are primarily available to police services, working in collaboration with municipal and community partners, to support local Community Safety and Well-Being (CSWB) initiatives, including mental health-related programs. For example, under the 2019-20 to 2021-22 Community Safety and Policing Grant local and provincial priorities funding streams, the ministry is providing funding to 27 police services/boards for projects involving an integrated response between police and a mental health worker to respond to situations of crisis (e.g., Mobile Crisis Response Teams). Community Safety and Well-Being Planning The ministry developed the Community Safety and Well-Being Planning Framework: A Shared Commitment in Ontario booklet, which includes the CSWB Planning Framework and a toolkit of practical guidance documents to assist municipalities, First Nations and their community partners as they engage in the CSWB planning process. The Framework encourages communities to work with various partners across sectors to proactively identify and address local priority risks in the community before they escalate and result in situations of crisis (e.g., crime, victimization or suicide). This involves reducing the number of incidents that require enforcement by shifting to more proactive, preventative programs and strategies that improve the social determinants of health (e.g., education, housing, mental health). In support of this work, effective January 1, 2019, the government mandated municipalities lead the development of CSWB plans which identify and address local priority risks to safety and well-being, working in partnership with police services/boards and various other sectors, including health/mental health, education, community/social services and children/youth services. Complementary to the Framework, a Situation Table is one type of multi-sectoral risk intervention model that is being implemented across our province. The ministry also offers the Risk-driven Tracking Database (RTD), which allows for the collection of risk-based data and helps to inform the CSWB planning process, free of charge to communities across Ontario that are engaged in multi-sectoral risk intervention models, such as Situation Tables. As of June 2020, 60 sites have been on- boarded to the RTD and any communities who are interested in being on-boarded to the RTD is encouragedto contact the ministry. …/7 24 Head of Council Page 7 Police-Hospital Transition Protocol Additionally, to improve front-line response to persons experiencing a mental health or addictions-related crisis, my ministry partnered with the Ministry of Health to support the Provincial Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee and CMHA of Ontario to develop a framework for local police emergency room transition protocols for persons apprehended under the Mental Health Act. On June 3, 2019,the Ministry of the Solicitor General and the Ministry of Healthjointly endorsed the release of Improving Police-Hospital Transitions: A Framework for Ontario, as well as the supporting toolkit, Tools for Developing Police-Hospital Transition Protocols in Ontario. The purpose of the framework and toolkit is to assist police services and hospitals with developing joint emergency department transition protocols, which are responsive to unique local needs, in order to ensure the seamless transfer of care for persons in a mental health or addictions crisis brought to a hospital by police officers. I hope you find this information useful and I appreciate your municipality’s support during this time of uncertainty. Sincerely, Sylvia Jones Solicitor General Minister Responsible for Anti-Racism c: Chief Administrative Officers Municipal Clerks 25 October 2, 2020 Sent via email to all Ontario Municipal Clerks Dear Municipal Clerks, At its meeting held September 24, 2020, Wellington County Council approved the following recommendation from the Administration, Finance and Human Resources Committee: WHEREAS previous assessment methodologies for aggregate resource properties valued areas that were used for aggregate resources or gravel pits at industrial land rates on a per acre basis of the total site and such properties were formally classified and taxed as industrial lands; and WHEREAS Wellington County Council supports a fair and equitable assessment system for all aggregate resource properties; and WHEREAS the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation determined, with the participation only of the Ontario Stone, Sand and Gravel Association, revised criteria for assessing aggregate resource properties; and WHEREAS Wellington County Council has concerns that the revised criteria does not fairly assess the current value of the aggregate resource properties. NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: (a) That Wellington County Council does not consider the revised criteria for assessment of aggregate resource properties as a fair method of valuation for these properties; and (b) That Wellington County Council believes there is a need to review the current assessment scheme for aggregate resource properties to address the inequity of property values; and (c) That Wellington County Council hereby calls upon the Province to work with the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation to address the assessment issue so that aggregate resource properties are assessed for their industrial value; and 26 (d) That Wellington County Council direct the Clerk to provide a copy of this motion to the Ministers of Finance; Municipal Affairs and Housing; and Natural Resources and Forestry; and to AMO, ROMA, and all Ontario municipalities and local MPP(s). Please find the Aggregate Resource Property Valuation and Advocacy report and Municipal Resolution enclosed. Wellington County Council is requesting that all Ontario municipalities adopt the Municipal Resolution and forward to Donna Bryce, Wellington County Clerk at donnab@wellington.ca upon passing. Should you have any questions please contact Ken DeHart, County Treasurer, at kend@wellington.ca or call 519.837.2600 ext 2920. Sincerely, Kim Courts Deputy Clerk 27 COMMITTEE REPORT To: Chair and Members of the Administration, Finance and Human Resources Committee From: Ken DeHart, County Treasurer Date: Tuesday, September 15, 2020 Subject:Aggregate Resource Property ValuationandAdvocacy Report Background: Through the County’s Assessment Base Management Policy and Programme approved in 2016; Wellington County has made significant efforts to maintain, protect and enhance the quality of the assessment roll. This includes reviewing the accuracy of individual assessments and ensuring the equitable distribution of the tax burden. The County remains a strong advocate for the accurate and equitable valuation and property tax treatment of all properties, including gravel pit and aggregate resource properties in the County and throughout Ontario. The County has been actively pursuing fair and accurate assessment valuations for gravel pits through two streams: 1.Assessment appeals heard by the Assessment Review Board 2.Advocacy through the province on a permanent policy solution Assessment Appeals The County has filed assessment appeals on all aggregate producing properties in its three southern- mostmunicipalities, being Puslinch, Erin and Guelph/Eramosa for the 2017 to 2020 taxation years. The purpose of these appeals is to ensure that the current value assessment of these properties is captured through the existing legislation, and to deal with how those properties are classified for taxation purposes. The effect of the current property tax valuation structureby the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation (“MPAC”) unfairly sees active gravel pits incurring less property tax than many single- family homes and small businesses as a result of unduly low and inaccurate current value assessments. It also leads to properties that are located in the same areas and are similar to gravel pits receiving vastly different property valuations, which contradicts the principle of fairness and transparency underpinning our taxation system that similar properties should be treated and taxed equally. Arbitrarily classifying gravel pits as among the lowest form of farmland (Class 5) sets an artificial cap on these producers’ property assessments and keeps their property taxes well below what they should be paying. In turn, residents and businesses are subsidizing the break that gravel producers are receiving. In terms of next steps for these appeals, a settlement conference is scheduled to take place on September 16 and hearings are scheduled for the weeks of November 16 and 23. 28 Advocacy for a Permanent Policy Solution The County has been working with its colleagues through the Top Aggregate Producing Municipalities of Ontario (TAPMO) to raise awareness of the assessments and the inequitable treatment of these properties and ask the government to review how these properties are assessed and treated from a property tax policy perspective through the MPAC review that is currently taking place. Through this work, TAPMO endorsed the attached municipal resolution to be shared with TAPMO municipalities for consideration at local Councils. The resolution formally asks the province to review how these properties are assessed in light of the inequitable treatment in comparison to other residential and business properties in the municipality. Several municipalities across the province have approved and forwarded this resolution to the province and local MPPs. To be clear, the County believes MPAC’s property valuation is incorrect even within the current legislation, however, the County is looking for further direction and possible legislative or regulatory changes that will eliminate future disputes. This kind of permanent policy change is in everyone’s best interest to resolve this issue once and for all. Staff recommend that the Administration, Finance and Human Resources Committee support the resolution and pass it along to County Council for approval. This is also an opportunity for the County to remind its member municipalities to review and give consideration to this resolution as well. AMO Delegation Meeting On August 18, 2020, in collaboration with the Top Aggregate Producing Municipalities of Ontario (TAPMO), County representatives met with Stan Cho, Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance, to discuss the need to improve how aggregate properties are assessed across Ontario under an equitable valuation system. The meeting was held during the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) conference. This is where municipal and provincial policymakers come together to discuss pressing issues facing both levels of government. Wellington County and other TAPMO members presented several policy-driven solutions to Mr. Cho that would make MPAC’s property tax valuations accurate and equitable. There are many possible legislative, regulatory or policy changes that can achieve a permanent solution. These include: Creating a separate class for aggregate producing properties (as was done for landfills in 2015); Directive (or regulation) from the Minister to MPAC regarding how to assess these types of properties to reflect their true market or industrial value; Remove the aggregate exemption from the Assessment Act (as was the situation prior to 2008). This would enable municipalities to maintain stability in local taxation levels and meet the needs of their communities. Directing MPACon how to assess these properties based on their true market value makes common sense and will result in stability and accuracy in the assessment process. The solution to remove the exemption of aggregate in the Assessment Act would allow MPAC to assess the full value of the property. 29 Summary Aggregate sites are important job creators and an increasingly critical element of public works that help to fuel steady economic growth across Ontario, especially as part of municipalities’ post-pandemic recovery. Yet, under the current MPAC valuation formula, their current value assessment is inaccurate such that these sites generate significantly less revenue for municipalities and the Province than other possible uses for the same land. This costs Ontario municipalities millions of dollars in lost tax revenue every year and negatively impacts their abilities to deliver more fulsome services and programmes to residents. The current system also generates less Education property taxes which shifts even more tax burden onto homeowners and small businesses. Municipalities are therefore eager to find a solution that is fair for all involved: the municipality, taxpayers, and aggregate producers. COVID-19 has highlighted the urgency for a policy-driven, equitable approach. Municipalities across Ontario are fighting to continue providing a high standard of services to our families and businesses who need them now more than ever. The lost tax revenue undermines our ability to enhance those services and make key infrastructure investments at a time when our residents are suffering. The County wants to be fair to aggregate producers while recognizing that they should be part of the solution in terms of helping families and businesses get back on their feet – the very people who are carrying the burden of the current MPAC system. Recommendation: That the Aggregate Resource Property Valuation and Advocacy Update Report be received for information; and That the attached resolution be supported by County Council and sent to the Ministry of Finance. Respectfully submitted, Ken DeHart, CPA, CGA County Treasurer 30 SCHEDULE A – MUNICIPAL RESOLUTION WHEREAS previous assessment methodologies for aggregate resource properties valued areas that were used for aggregate resources or gravel pits at industrial land rates on a per acre basis of the total site and such properties were formally classified and taxed as industrial lands; and WHEREAS Wellington County Council supports a fair and equitable assessment system for all aggregate resource properties; and WHEREAS the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation determined, with the participation only of the Ontario Stone, Sand and Gravel Association, revised criteria for assessing aggregate resource properties; and WHEREAS Wellington County Council has concerns that the revised criteria does not fairly assess the current value of the aggregate resource properties; NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: (a) That Wellington County Council does not consider the revised criteria for assessment of aggregate resource properties as a fair method of valuation for these properties; and (b) That Wellington County Council believes there is a need to review the current assessment scheme for aggregate resource properties to address the inequity of property values; and (c) That Wellington County Council hereby calls upon the Province to work with the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation to address the assessment issue so that aggregate resource properties are assessed for their industrial value; and (d) That Wellington County Council direct the Clerk to provide a copy of this motion to the Ministers of Finance; Municipal Affairs and Housing; and Natural Resources and Forestry; and to AMO, ROMA, and all Ontario municipalities and local MPP(s). 31 Office of the Mayor Rodger Bonneau 2020 Sent via E-mail Re: Cannabis Production Dear Ministers, Members of Parliament, and Members of Provincial Parliament, Please be advised that the Council for the Corporation of the Township of Asphodel- Norwood passed the following resolution at its regular meeting of September 22, 2020: Motion No. 239/20 | Moved by: Councillor Walsh | Seconded by: Deputy Mayor Burtt WHEREAS the Ontario Federation of Agriculture has adopted the position that licenced cannabis production for medical and/or recreational-use purposes should be considered a farming activity; AND WHEREAS the Government of Canada introduced Bill C-45 (the Cannabis Act) to create the foundation for a comprehensive national framework to provide restricted access to regulated cannabis, and to control its production, distribution, sale, importation, exportation, and possession; AND WHEREAS Section 7 of the Cannabis Act requires that any person who intends to submit an application for a licence for cultivation, a licence for processing, or a licence for sale that authorizes the possession of cannabis must provide written notice to: a) The local government,b) The local fire authority, and c) The local police force or the Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment responsible for providing policing services to the area in which the site is referred to in the application; AND WHE REAS Section 35(1) of the Act requires a holder of a licence for cultivation, a licence for processing, or a licence for sale that authorizes the possession of cannabis to provide a written notice to the local authorities within 30 days of issuance, amendment, suspension, reinstatement or revocation of alicence and provide a copy of said notice to the Minister; and 32 FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Township of Asphodel-Norwood requests a governing body in cannabis production that: 1.Takes a unified approach to land use planning restrictions; 2.Enforces the regulations under the Cannabis Act on behalf of the licencing agency and ensures local authorities are in fact provided with notification of any licence issuance, amendment, suspension, reinstatement, or revocation within their region; 3.Communicates more readily with local governments; and 4.Provides local governments with more support. AND FURTHER BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Township of Asphodel-Norwood will forward this motion to the following partners: All municipalities in Ontario, the MP and MPP of Northumberland-Peterborough South, the MP and MPP of Peterborough- Kawartha, the Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, and the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food with the request that they enact legislation to support local governments with land use management and enforcement issues. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Rodger Bonneau, Mayor Township of Asphodel-Norwood E. Hardeman, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food D Piccini, MPP Northumberland-Petrborough South P.Lawrence, MP Northumberland-Petrborough South D.Smith, MPP Peterborough –Kawartha M.Monsef, MP Peterborough-Kawartha All municipalities in Ontario 33 34 35 TOWN OF AYLMER COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICEthat the Town of Aylmer Committee of Adjustment will hold avirtual public hearing in accordance with Section 45 of the Planning Act, R.S.O. 1990, (as amended), on Monday,October 19, 2020at 7:00 p.m., in a public livestream available at www.aylmer.ca. APPLICATION NO. A.1-20is made by Joseph and Jasmine DeClara, the owners oftheproperty known municipallyas 206 Sydenham Street East, in the Town of Aylmer. The applicantis requesting a minor variance from the requirements of the Town’s Zoning By-law No. 57-99, as amended. The applicant is seeking relief from: Section 9(3)(f)Zone Requirements – RearYard Depth (Minimum) from 7.5metres (24.5ft.) to 3.35metres (11ft.)for the purpose ofconstructing a 11.89 sq. metre (128sq. ft.) addition on the existing single detached dwelling. In addition, the subject property is noted as containing an existing single detached dwelling with continuing legal non-conforming Front Yard Depth and Rear Yard Depth already in existence. The proposed addition would extend the existing non-conformity in Rear Yard Depth and is not proposed to encroach further into the required rear yard. Additional information relating to the application is available for inspection between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays at Aylmer Town Hall.Those interested in additional information are encouraged to use alternative methods of contacting Aylmer Town Hall, including telephone or email. A contact directory is available at www.aylmer.ca. ALSO TAKE NOTICEthat signed, written submissions shall be accepted by the Secretary- Treasurer prior to the hearing and such submissions shall be available for inspection by any interested party. In addition, if a party, who is notified, does not express their desire to receive further notice of hearings, the Committee can proceed,and the party is not entitled to any further notice of hearings. A COPY OF THE DECISIONwill be mailed to those persons who attend or are represented at the hearing and those who have filed a written request with the Secretary for Notice of the Committee’s Decision. Dated this 30th day of September, 2020. Josh Brick Director of Legislative Services/Clerk, Town of Aylmer 46 Talbot Street West Aylmer ON N5H 1J7 Ph: 519-773-3164 Fax: 519-765-1446 www.aylmer.ca